Advised Podcast Ep 001: Misinformation, Medicare & Entrepreneurship – an in-depth discussion with Jocelyn Wolf

Join us for an insightful conversation in the debut episode of 'Advised' podcast!  In this episode, host Rick engages in a candid discussion with Medicare expert Jocelyn Wolf. They delve into the world of health insurance, demystifying common misconceptions, sharing valuable insights, and exploring how to navigate the complex landscape of Medicare. Discover why it's crucial to critically evaluate information, avoid blind decisions, and find trusted resources to make informed choices. Whether you're approaching retirement or simply seeking guidance on insurance matters, this episode offers practical advice and empowering perspectives. Subscribe now for more expert discussions on financial and insurance topics!"

Listen above or read the transcript below, then let us know what you think about the episode!

Rick:

I have a lot of folks that are being scared off by their friends, neighbors, and coworkers because their friend, neighbor, or coworker had a bad experience. They had a bad experience because they didn't know what the hell they were doing. That's the truth. Welcome everybody to the first episode of Advised I'm your host, Rick Lui. The mission of this podcast is to lift the veil on various financial topics by always being honest, objective, and unfiltered. I'm excited to have my first guest here. Her name is Jocelyn Wolfe. Jocelyn, welcome to the show.

Jocelyn:

Thanks for having me.

Rick:

Jocelyn is the co-founder and owner of Evolv Insurance Group right here in central pa. Jocelyn specializes in all things Medicare, but don't let that scare off the younger crowd. We're going to go broad in some other topics and it should be helpful for everybody. So first off, Jocelyn, honestly, I just want to thank you for having the courage to be my first guest. I made it very clear to you that I have no idea what I'm doing, that I'm self-producing this, and when I explained the concept, you didn't hesitate and you jumped right on it. So I thank you for supporting the vision and thanks for being here.

Jocelyn:

Yeah, thanks for having me.

Rick:

So let's get right into it. The first thing that I want to know, we were just talking about this off camera, is how does a 30 something female become the owner of a company focusing on all things Medicare?

Jocelyn:

Probably like anyone who ends up in insurance, that wasn't like anyone's intention. They didn't go out of college thinking, I'm going to work in insurance, but I was working for my family's company and we sold it and I went and worked for the company that we sold it to and it was a much bigger company and it was backed by private equity. So it was very different from a family owned company.

Rick:

And if you don't mind, for the central PA folks, do you want to mention what that company was? It

Jocelyn:

Was Wolf Furniture. Yes, yes. Yeah. So I was working out there and I was commuting to Detroit every month and I just thought, this is not what I like. I don't like a super big corporate environment. I don't want to live in Detroit. So I went back to the drawing board and started asking everyone, what do you do? What do you like to do? And I was really looking at tech sales because I had worked at an IT company prior to working for my family's company, and my dad actually suggested to talk to my cousin who was doing something with Medicare in South Florida, and she's around my age. So I gave her a call and I was like, what exactly are you doing? She explained it. I was not familiar with health insurance, insurance terms, anything with Medicare. And I went down to Florida and spent a couple days with her and I really was like, okay, I think I can do this.

And I like it. I enjoy meeting with these people. I think that this is awesome that you can help someone and still get paid because that was something I was looking for where you were getting fulfillment both financially and mentally from helping people. And I felt like a lot of jobs didn't give you that option. So at the time, my dad's friend who owns Salame Insurance here in Altoona had been looking at adding a Medicare component to his business because he owns a person lines agency and people who were clients of theirs for home auto, everything would call and say, also do, Hey, do you do Medicare? And really our paths lined up at the perfect time and we started Evolve, which is the sister company of Sula and we specialize in Medicare. So that's how I ended up and it is four years, so it was four years. That's awesome. End of July's.

Rick:

So let's go a little deeper there because that actually interests me. You go down to Florida, you find this niche, you could have easily joined any insurance company and been a representative for them. Why did you decide to go the entrepreneurial route? Was it from your family from coming from that and seeing it or was something else that was driving you to do that? Because it's a big difference? Yes, it's a big difference. It's a big commitment. I

Jocelyn:

Think going from working from a family owned company and having some type of autonomy and ownership over what you do to a super corporate environment where I felt like I had to ask for time off down to a half day and submit all these forms and do all these PowerPoints, I just realized that was not a good fit for me. And I felt like sometimes it was counterproductive because I was doing so much busy work that I was missing actually doing meaningful work. So honestly working for a carrier or another established company really didn't cross my mind. And then when Barry approached me and said, Hey, do you want to start a business? I really just kind of thought I want to do this. And I was so committed to working for myself because I had had that other experience. And also I love the idea that if I was working for myself, I could control everything and also I could really do whatever I felt was in the best interest for the client. I didn't have someone with oversight or telling me what to do and how to do it.

Rick:

And a lot of times they have different agendas than you. I came from a world like that and anybody that knows me knows that I'm not a very good pet, for lack of better words, so that it's a similar path. Anybody, I guess young or old, but especially young or young females that are trying to find their way or in an industry that they like but don't necessarily the big thumb that's pushing on them. Any advice for them if they're possibly considering going out on their own or starting their own business?

Jocelyn:

I think especially around here, so many small business owners talking to people, even people who are not in the same space that you want to be in, who are doing their own thing or fellow entrepreneurs and hearing their stories and meeting with everyone and taking a little bit of insider advice from everyone. That was so helpful for me. And I have lots of friends who are in different industries from construction, financial services, random things, but there's still stuff you're able to take away that I feel like is helpful. So I think networking. And I also have found that people, especially around here, which is part of the reason why I moved back to Altoona and I never would've been able to do what I've done in this amount of time without being here, is people are so helpful and kind. So I felt like that was huge for me to get this group of people who are willing to just give you help and didn't expect anything from it, and just wanted to see another business owner succeed. So I think networking was super important and reaching out to anyone and everyone who you think might be in your shoes or be able to offer you some advice or also put you in touch with someone else. Another thing is meeting with people who say, oh, I'm not really in this space or, I don't know a lot about this, but hey, my college roommate does. Absolutely. So there's a lot of the networking component I think was huge.

Rick:

Yeah. What about, I know it was maybe a little bit of a unique situation where you guys fit really well, but what about the partnership? You don't have to go into specifics about it, but do you think that, I think a lot of people don't think that way. If I'm going to go out on my own, I'm by myself and I have to start from zero. Do you think that partnership helped expedite to where you are today?

Jocelyn:

For sure, because having someone with an established business and just having their support and guidance on how to start a business and what all entails, and also just to give you a pep talk when things are not going as quickly as you want them or the way you want them to be, I think is really important. And I think I've been lucky to create a couple partnerships from people who I've met and we just connected on a different way. And that's another thing that's interesting is if you meet with someone and you feel like you're very aligned and there's maybe, I hate to use the corporate word, but a synergy there where you're thinking, okay, how can we come together and help people be open to exploring that as opposed to just thinking you have to do it on your own. Because I have been able to create success those ways and they've opened other doors versus if I had just been like, no, it's my thing. I need to do it all by myself. And

Rick:

I think it's interesting the way you did it because what you did was, excuse me, you took someone that owned a similar business and then you guys did a spinoff sister business. So it's not part of that, but he has connections and clients in that world at least that can be advantageous to the sister business that he now owns. And I think a lot of people think that they don't think that way. They don't think of approaching a business owner. You might get a 50 nos, but if you think, Hey, I would be a good compliment, my business would be a good compliment to that, instead of trying to compete with it, take that person's advantages maybe and multiply them. But you don't always have to do it a hundred percent on your own. And partnerships don't always have to be two people that don't have a job either. So it's interesting to look at that way, but so you're the Medicare expert, that's what I'm calling you. So just deal with it. And something that I like to ask people in I have a niche is what do you routinely see people getting wrong in your industry? What do you just want to scream from the mountaintop? Because you just get frustrated that everybody keeps getting it wrong.

Jocelyn:

I think this is especially relevant right now in today's Medicare climate because even if you're not in that world, maybe your parents or your grandparents are, and you see how many phone calls they get, you see the TV advertisements that are constant, the mail that they get something that I think people get wrong or it's just overwhelming. And it's overwhelming because you don't know about health insurance. If you worked, you had your group plan. This isn't, and it's complicated. And it's a government program, federal health insurance program, and there's a lot of rules and stuff. So I think what people get wrong is they listen to this mass marketing that is not sometimes the most straightforward or honest, or they listen to their friend or their neighbor who might have very completely different experiences. They might listen to their sister in another state. So I think what I see people getting wrong is just blindly going off what is given to them and what is told to them and not seeking out, okay, I don't need to understand this fully. This is never going to be my wheelhouse, but I need to have some type of grasp on it and I have options and I have a little bit more control than just what is being told or talked at me about.

Rick:

And in your industry, I know you have mentioned this before, not only is it maybe information with good intentions, but bad context, but there's also a lot of intentionally bad information out there or unethical sales practices, things that are meant to maybe look like they're officially coming from the government phishing type things. You see a lot of that too, don't you?

Jocelyn:

Yes. Yeah. And that is something that really does grind my gears because when I started my company, I always wanted it to look separate and be clearly that I was not connected to Medicare. I don't work for Medicare. I don't use red, white and blue and my logo colors. There's very clear disclaimers that I'm not connected to Medicare, but when people or different marketing materials kind of present themselves as official and someone fills it out, they assume, oh, it looks official. It's saying Pennsylvania residents, you might be entitled to benefits that you might not be. And then next thing you know, you have someone showing up at your house,

Rick:

They think it's coming from the government and it's coming from a sales organization that's trying to solicit you. And that's what you're seeing a lot of.

Jocelyn:

Yeah. And the phone calls, we're sending out new Medicare cards, we need you to confirm your Medicare ID with us over the phone. You are late on payments. We need you to make a payment for your Medicare part B premium right now over the phone.

Rick:

How does somebody know the difference?

Jocelyn:

I always tell people, call Medicare and call social security. See how long you wait on hold. They are not doing outbound phone calls. They are not calling you. They will not call you. Anything comes officially via mail unless maybe you've sent something in and you're waiting for a call and be very reluctant as to, they're usually in these marketing materials, have a disclaimer, we are not connected or endorsed by the US government, blah, blah, blah. This is consent for a licensed representative to reach out to you. So really

Rick:

Go through find, get your magnifying glass out and try to find that first.

Jocelyn:

Yeah, and I always tell people, if you're not sure or you're really just confused and you don't want to make a mistake, talk to one of your kids, talk to a family friend. I have clients who text me pictures of mail that they get or they'll have me listen to a phone call or they'll tell me what it says and I can quickly tell 'em, yes, that is something you need to take action on, or no, that's not just go ahead and toss that in the garbage.

Rick:

Yeah, I'm glad you said that because I mean, I see parallels in my industry a lot of times there is a sales aspect to it. We don't sell anything in my practice, but there's a lot of folks that look and talk like me, maybe don't talk like me, but talk like I'm supposed to anyways in this industry and their goal is to sell you things. Now some of them have good intentions, but they still have a huge conflict of interest. They're going to sales meetings, not financial planning meetings. And I say the same thing, just use common sense. I mean, if someone calls you out of the blue, even if it's with maybe you having an old insurance company, I see this a lot. I have an old insurance policy that I've had for 30 years and now all of a sudden that company starts calling me a lot.

Not the big company, but a local representative. They're likely trying to sell you something. And it's really a good tip off when they say things like, I just happened to be in your neighborhood next week. Can you meet between three and five? If they want to come to your house unsolicited by you, likely they're trying to sell you something. I mean, I think Girl Scout cookies are sold door to door, not high-end financial advice. So things like that. Where we're also seeing now because financial planning has really taken off is they're using that as a sales tactic. I see a lot of folks calling things financial plans. They really aren't much more sophisticated than an online calculator. You could go do yourself. And what they're doing is they're using that to convince you to buy their product or service, and then there's no follow up with it.

So here's this one page printout that clearly shows what I'm trying to sell is going to solve all of your problems. And as soon as you buy that thing, now I have to ignore you because my income is based on me going to try to find somebody else to do the same thing too. And it's a shame. But I think that with the amount of information that we have available to us now, I think people need to be aware of that, but also should start to be able to pick it out like you said. I mean listen, Medicare's not calling you. You can't get ahold of 'em when you want to. They're not just proactively calling you, trying to help you out of the blue and read the disclaimers on the things that get sent to you in the mail. And if you're not sure before you start inviting people into your home or giving them your social security number, ask somebody that would know like a Jocelyn Wolf. So that's really interesting. And again, we see that on our side and not quite as sneaky as you do because when you guys are associated, well, not associated, but you're dealing with a government agency

Jocelyn:

And you're going after a more, not in any type of, but a more protected group of people as people age, especially if you don't have any, you're not familiar with Medicare and this is your first time in and as you age, you lose a little bit of confidence sometimes with making these big decisions. And I think people, there are some bad actors who go and exploit that. And I think to your point in financial services in general, people in this day and age, I think there's been a shift. I'm not sure how things were done like 20, 30, 40 years ago, but people want to be educated in service not sold. So there's a big difference between educating someone and servicing them as your client and getting them as a client versus selling them something. Agreed. And that's kind of always been my approach similar to yours.

Rick:

And that's the difference between customers and clients. And it's a big distinction because having a client means to continue to serve them, not just 10 minutes after you sold them something. And I know you guys do that as well on an annual basis,

Jocelyn:

But there are tons of people who example will say, I want to be an X, Y, Z county. I don't even live there, but I'm going to drop leads. I'm going to order mail, drop it in that county. I'll be there for a week and I'll cold call and I'll set appointments and I'll see what I can find and then I might leave. And you are sitting there and you're like, I don't even know who I bought that from. I didn't hear that anymore. I think that was very much a trend a couple years ago. I'm not saying that's the wrong way to do business, that's not the way I choose to

Rick:

Do business. It is for something like that. There's nothing wrong with being in a sales organization. There's nothing wrong with selling. And there sure as hell isn't anything wrong with making money for what you do and what you are an expert in, but presenting yourself one way and then delivering something else is what I have a problem with. And it doesn't matter what industry it's in. And that's really what we're getting to the heart of is I have no problem with people that sell insurance. I think it's a necessity. I have no problem with that. What I have a problem with is when you dress yourself up and advertise yourself as giving financial advice, but your end goal is to sell a life insurance policy, that's where it comes to just being transparent. There's no guesswork in what you do. There's no guesswork in what I do. And then when we have people going around pretending to be associated with the government and things like that, it's just, it's unfortunate, but it exists and we want people to be aware of it and just think twice before you let somebody in your house or sign something.

So you said something else that I do want to go into a little bit. What was interesting is it wasn't just the salesman, it was the neighbor, the brother-in-law. Tell me a little bit about that. People getting advice from folks that maybe aren't qualified to give it and it either resulting in them making a bad decision or at least producing a ton of anxiety before they actually get informed correctly.

Jocelyn:

So I always preface health insurance is no different than any insurance product like car insurance, homeowner's, insurance, whatever. It's giving you peace of mind and everyone's level of peace of mind is different and everyone's priorities are different when they're buying insurance. So it's nice to get feedback and input from your family members and friends and whoever else they can say, oh, I like X, Y, Z insurance carrier or whatever, I have a good experience with my insurance. But at the end of the day, you guys have different budgets, you have different medications, you have different health deans, you have different personal preferences. So what's good for one is not necessarily blindly good for the other. So when they come in sometimes and someone comes in and says like, listen, I want this product, this is what my sister has, she's happy with it. And one Medicare state specific and county specific. So I can be like, great, your sister lives in California. We can't even get that product here. But I think, like I said, really saying what's the best fit for me and knowing my needs are very specific to me.

Rick:

Yeah, well it comes down to context. I mean inexperience, like you said, obviously I see that all the time on various different topics, retirement taxes, but the biggest glaring one is investing. I mean, the people who give investing tips is just endless at barbecues and at work and whatever else.

Jocelyn:

And everyone's goals are different. Everyone's situation is different. So it works for your

Rick:

Yeah. Well, here's the other thing. I mean, a lot of times they leave out one side or the other. So what I see a lot of actually is the bad experience. So I have a lot of folks that are being scared off by their friends, neighbors and coworkers because their friend, neighbor or coworker had a bad experience. They had a bad experience because they didn't know what the hell they were doing. That's the truth. I mean, I still have people regularly recalling 2008, 2009 crash as an excuse or reason why they are still to this day ultra conservative. And there's nothing wrong with being conservative if it matches your objectives, but a lot of these people need to be more aggressive to meet their actual goals. They're not making enough money since January of 2009. That was 15 years ago, right? Yeah. It was bad for 18 months though, not for 10 years.

Since January of 2009, the s and p 500 is up over 500%. So let me repeat that again. Up over 500% since January of 2009. And there are still people who are focused on the fact that their account went down 35% in nine or 10 months. And I understand that was horrifying and scary. And if you were in real estate, that's a whole different deal. I'm not trying to make it a small deal, but for the folks that were invested properly or actually stayed invested within less than two years, they were back to even and have prospered significantly ever since. The guy that's given the advice to not trust the stock market and to buy bars of gold and put it in your basement, he was the guy that won the account, went down 30%, sold everything at a loss, dug a hole in his backyard and buried it, and then tells everybody how much money he lost in the stock market.

Well, he didn't do it right. So it comes to context and like you said, different experiences too. I see often that people are getting investment advice or tax advice and the person giving it has good intentions, but their situation is completely different. So it doesn't apply. And oftentimes it leads the recipient of that information to make bad decisions or have a ton of anxiety while they're trying to find the answer or the solution. And again, it just comes down to how much information we have available. And it's difficult. You have to sift through the crap, but I mean, I know I try to put stuff out. You have a great blog that you spell stuff out in regular, just in regular talk all the time, and there's endless sources of good information. Look where the source is from out there, not just local stuff, but nationally.

And so today we have this information at our fingertips and you have to sort through it a little bit to try to find a credible source, but you shouldn't be listening to your sister for your financial advice without then immediately fact-checking it or seeing how it applies to your situation. Your sister might be the smartest person in the world, but if she doesn't know how those things apply to you because you're in a completely different tax bracket or you're in whatever the situation is, it can lead to bad decisions. And the person giving the advice had all the best intentions in the world, this was my experience, is what they should be saying. Like you said, this is who helped me. I don't know if they can help you, but go ask 'em. I trust them. Or This is the company that I use. I don't know if it's right for you. This is the thing that I did or invested in or bought. Don't know if that's right for you. Just throw that out there. Because when it comes across as definitive advice, a lot of times people just follow it. They don't know that they shouldn't be paying for that or they could have done it a different way or it doesn't apply to them.

Jocelyn:

I think especially around here, and I say this to my clients in regards to whether they need financial services or they're looking for someone to help them with the Medicare, whether or not interview people the same way. You go to a doctor, you have options. You're the shopper, you're the consumer, please. So if you need help and you want to work with someone, we have a lot of great options who are local, who you can see who where their office is, who are not a one and done. I don't even know where that person went. But also if you don't feel like they really understand you or it's a good fit or you guys just aren't connecting, you have options and it's not a bad thing. So I really just try to, if people sit down with me and maybe I'm not a good fit for them or they're looking for something else, that's fine. I'd rather encourage them to go find someone that they do really enjoy working with or find a financial advisor who they feel like is aligned for what they want. Or again, like I said, doctors, I hear a lot of times people will say that they are really unhappy with their doctor and they don't feel like their doctor is really listening to them or advocating them. And I'll tell them, Hey, listen, there's put a pool.

Rick:

There's more out

Jocelyn:

There. You are not committed to that person if you're not happy, and they might be a great doctor and it just might not be the right fit personality wise, which is totally fine because you're the consumer. So you have a little bit more control and just kind of trying to empower people that they have the control and they are able to make those decisions and it comes down to what's a good fit for them and what feels right.

Rick:

Yeah, I love that. I mean, I've always said that and pounded the table to interview people. I mean, I'm always saying it on the investing in financial planning side, but it's the same for everything. It blows my mind that you are giving your life savings oftentimes to someone that you've had one meeting with and none with anybody else.

I mean, think about that. And it's the same thing whether you're buying a car or buying insurance or whatever it is, you have options. You can do a lot of research online before you even go meet these people to weeded it down. That didn't exist 15 years ago. Okay, now, I mean, I can tell you right now, I know what to expect before I walk in the door. I'm not doing business with anybody that I can't look up and snoop on right now. I want what they say and do to match what they told me online because of course anybody can put anything online. But I think when you're putting stuff on your website, it holds you a little bit more accountable to actually follow through with some of those things. So yeah, just research folks. I mean, whether it's the company itself or whether it's the individual that you're meeting with, research 'em and do more than one. Interview 'em, ask 'em questions. Know what questions to ask, I think is a big thing too. Ask 'em what their service model is. What do you do for me after tomorrow, after I give you my money or after I buy that insurance policy, what do you do next?

Jocelyn:

Yeah, I think that's huge. And also like, are you around? Can I call you? Do I have to wait until a certain time of the year to call you? It's interesting how many people think that they can only have access versus if you're a client. No, if you have a problem issue, that's right. It's an ongoing relationship. It's not a one and done. So I think just empowering the individual to say, you have options. Seek them out, and at the end of the day, do what feels right for you.

Rick:

What are some of the most common misinformation that folks are getting that you see around here? Maybe they're getting it from their brother or something like that, that is causing them to make poor decisions.

Jocelyn:

Timing in regards to when to enroll in Medicare is huge, because if you are enrolling in Medicare upon turning 65, that is going to be your health insurance. You don't have group coverage through your employer, your spouse, that is your route. You would go ahead and pick that up. But then also people who are still working and covered under a large group planner, their spouse's large group plan don't have to pick up Medicare. They might want to compare and contrast, okay, what does the group plan look like versus Medicare? Maybe the group plan's really expensive or has a really high deductible and that does not work well for me, so maybe I should consider Medicare. But I do find people will say, oh no, you need to apply for Medicare. You need to apply for Medicare. You're going to have a late enrollment penalty. Meanwhile, that person's still working and they went ahead and just applied for Medicare, and they're now not only having their health insurance deducted from their paycheck, they're paying a Medicare premium, and then they have two insurance when they really didn't need to, but they were listening to someone who said, no, you have to, you're going to have a late enrollment penalty.

Rick:

So now they're walking around paying Medicare premiums when they don't need to.

Jocelyn:

Correct. Yeah,

Rick:

Because that coverage is only kicking in after their primary.

Jocelyn:

Yeah, that's a large group plan. Yeah. So I think also because you want to first compare when is Medicare going to be my insurance option? Am I still working? Am I not still working? Okay, what's the size of my employer? That's another thing. People get wrong, especially around here, there are a lot of small employers, 20 or less than the eyes of Medicare. If you are covered under a group plan in 20 or less, you have to pick up Medicare. Medicare is your primary. You can stay on the group plan if the employer allows, or you can choose to go fully Medicare and pick up whatever type of Medicare insurance plan that coordinates that you want. But I do have some people who say, oh, I was covered into the group plan and now they're dinged with this late enrollment penalty because Medicare says that small group plan was not credible coverage.

Meanwhile, they thought it was credible group coverage. Their employer might've thought it was credible group coverage. So I think just kind of knowing your scenario and if you need to ask someone or there's a lot of great information online, but also just I get that a lot. I get phone calls saying I need to pick up Medicare. And I'll say, okay, great. How do you currently get your insurance? Oh, it's through an employer. Okay, who do I work for? I work for Bayer. Okay. That's a huge company. Are you still working? Yeah. Do you have any issues with the coverage? Is it affordable? Do you like the network, the benefit, everything? No, it's great. It costs me a little amount out of my paycheck. You don't have to do anything.

Rick:

Just save the monthly Medicare premiums. Yeah. And you said something that I want to touch on, which is the information. I mean the fact that, and I get it in other industries, I'm guilty of this too, taking somebody's advice and just running with it. But if you can't Google, do I need to sign up for Medicare while I'm still working and find a thousand articles that explain everything you just said? Right? It exists.

Jocelyn:

I think though, and there's an interesting conversation about AI and AI replacing human jobs, which I do think there will be a component of that moving forward, but again, people can find all the information and they want, but sometimes they just want to talk to someone else and get that confidence. They can say, I read

Rick:

It. Oh, I agree. I agree. So what I'm saying though is Susie at the Christmas party already scared the hell out of me and told me that if I don't sign up for Medicare, I'm going to get late enrollment penalty and all that stuff. Why is the first thing that I do go and up for Medicare instead of going and Googling this and doing some research or reading a blog post or calling Evolve or something like that.

Jocelyn:

I think that can be on the value of human to human interaction and kind of placing

Rick:

Weight when talking to a human. Yeah, and that's super interesting. And like I said, I see that crossover in my industry all the time. Yeah, I'm sure. So something that, I mean, I know you may not know the answer to this, but I'm curious what your perspective is, is why isn't there? Because that's a simple mistake. That is something that you could ask two, maybe three questions and advise someone which direction to go. You do not need to do a full financial plan on someone to decide whether they should or should not enroll in Medicare at 65. Why isn't that simple task being done at the Medicare level? Why isn't there some gatekeeping information there that stops these people from signing up when they don't need it, when it's a redundant coverage and they're wasting premiums?

Jocelyn:

I think even though the information may be out there and they may talk to Medicare, like I said, depending on the situation, you can be on hold for a while and it's not so easy. And depending on the representative, some are great, some are a little bit harder to get an,

Rick:

But they have to actually sign up. Yes. So there's an act of signing up.

Jocelyn:

Yes.

Rick:

Why isn't whether it is human intervention or automation, there's some questionnaire or checkbox that then even if it doesn't stop you from doing it, educates you and says, Hey, you just told us that you work for an employer that has more than 21 employees did. It's just a popup that they have to acknowledge.

Jocelyn:

Yeah, I mean it's interesting because

Rick:

During how

Jocelyn:

The application it does ask, are you covered under group coverage? But it

Rick:

Doesn't ask why.

Jocelyn:

No, it'll ask the name of the employer and the dates that you were covered if the coverage has ended. But it doesn't ask the size. And I don't know if also maybe that's something to do with when you're on a government website and doing stuff with the government. Sometimes it's a little bit more complicated and it's not where we're used to some of these other websites that are super user-friendly and the interface is there and they're trying to hedge you off and they're really thinking about what you would think. I don't know necessarily if we see that on government.

Rick:

Well, we don't. But I think the point is that we should and we could. Something like that's an easy mistake to avoid just by a pop-up box that says before you move forward, did you know? And then they pause, read it and say, oh, I either don't need this or to be sure I'm going to go gather some more information. But instead, they're led right through it except sign up pay premiums for, I mean, some people are working a lot longer now, life expectancies longer. There's a whole big reason why their jobs are less labor intensive. A lot of people actually enjoy what they're doing. They're working to 67, 70. They could be paying those premiums for a long time for no good reason. So that's interesting. So when we wrap up here, what's one key takeaway? And it could just be a repeat of something that you've already said, but what if you could give the listeners one thing to take away? You really want them to know what would it be?

Jocelyn:

I think two things. Give everything a look with some real scrutiny. Don't just blindly listen to what is being told to you and realize you are being marketed at. And really, you're the consumer. You have control, you have options. So educate yourself. And also, there are lots of people like me. I mean obviously I'm biased. I think I do a really good job for my clients. I care a lot about them.

Rick:

But you're also a resource. It's not just that you don't have to hire somebody like Jocelyn to get value from her. She's a resource, she has a blog. She puts out content. She's giving you information. There's a lot of people like her. It's not unique to that, but

Jocelyn:

That's, find those people because there's tons of people who I have a quick conversation with and I answer question, and they might never be a client because they have insurance through some union plan. That's really great for them. But just finding people who you connect with, who you like asking those questions and realizing that there's more resources out there available than you may think who can just give you that confidence when navigating what can be a really over complicated and overwhelming process. Right.

Rick:

Yep. There you go. That was episode one of Advised. I really, honestly, truly appreciate you having the courage to do this. I appreciate you coming on helping me kick off this project, and we'll definitely be sure to have you back. Thanks for listening, and please don't forget to subscribe. If you're watching this on YouTube, hit subscribe and the little bell that will let you know when the new episodes come out. If you're listening on Apple Podcasts or Amazon, wherever you're listening, hit subscribe or add to library. We're going to try put a few of these out a month and just to add value. Thanks again.

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